Happy New Year 2019

A silhouette of a hand holding a burning Sparkler against a brilliant sunset.

Another year has passed. 2018 delivered many challenges. These challenges (some feeling quite impossible) have only served to deepen our commitment to improving the human response to adversity. Life IS uncertain. You don’t always get a heads-up before a crisis. Long before we get to processing and problem-solving any given crisis, we must respond. How we respond impacts the way in which we approach resolution. We know that the Skills & Attitudes of resilience can help. Continue reading “Happy New Year 2019”

Building Resilience Newsletter 11/2018

An arm from the elbow up emerging from a breaking wave and giving the "thumbs up". BounceBack Traemark appears in the corner.

Our Newsletter will be posted for the last time as of 12/2018.

If you wish to continue to access our newsletter,  join our email list by clicking this link.

As 2018 comes to a close, we are feeling grateful for a productive year and optimistic that good things are yet to come. We thank all of you for your ongoing support and encouragement as we continue to pursue our goals.

Continue reading “Building Resilience Newsletter 11/2018”

Building Resilience Newsletter

Hand appearing above a breaking ocean wave and giving the "thumbs up."

What’s New?

Building Resilience, L.L.C., Train-the-Trainer Program

We are currently developing a new training program targeting students from middle school to the post-secondary level. The student training content will come from the challenges presented in our premier tool, BounceBack. BounceBack is a serious game, a tool to help build mental toughness by asking people to respond to real-world challenges, using the Skills & Attitudes of resilience. BounceBack was developed as a tool to practice responding to life’s challenges. It’s very simple. It’s practice. Continue reading “Building Resilience Newsletter”

Terrorism

The plight of the disenfranchised in our country.

Mass shootings and acts of violence are daily occurrences in our country. Most of these are committed by individuals who have lived in this country for many years and are often third and fourth generation Americans. Very few of these acts of violence have been committed by immigrants or foreign saboteurs. They are domestic terrorists. Unfortunately, we don’t seem to want to talk about or deal with these folks, and the present Administration would rather focus on building walls and expelling foreigners from this country. That, unfortunately, will not keep us safe.

There are many young people in America, some of them new arrivals, but many are third and fourth generation Americans who feel disenfranchised by this country, who do not feel a part of their communities. They indeed share many similarities with adolescents who have recently moved to a new community or school either from another part of this country or from another part of the world. Unfortunately, many of them lack the skills and attitudes necessary to become integrated into their communities.

One of the programs that we’ve been working on at Building Resilience would teach the skills and the attitudes of resilience that are necessary for their integration into our society. This program would focus on the empowerment of educators and students who would be actively involved in the creation of the program. Through increasing proficiency in these skills, such as connecting with others, communicating effectively, being flexible, being able to problem solve, manage strong feelings, and developed a sense of purpose, we would seek to increase self-esteem and integration. And most importantly, we would seek to decrease the likelihood of these young people becoming more disenchanted, isolated, dysfunctional, and radicalized. We do not need any more Sandy Hooks or Columbine shootings, or Boston Marathon bombings.

Better regulation of gun sales is important. And certainly, there is a need for better services for persons with a mental disorder. But more mental health services will not solve this problem. Research indicates that most of these individuals do not fit neatly into a diagnostic category of being mentally ill. What is clear is that most, whether they are from here or from another country, do not feel they have a viable role or place in our society. They are isolated and are easy targets for radicalization. We need to look at what we are doing to radicalize these young people and what we can do to make them a part of our society.

Dr. Ron Breazeale

Ron Breazeale, Ph.D.

 

 

 

 

 

News from Building Resilience: 05/17/18

America Retires v.3 Now Available

Work is done. It’s time to enjoy. It’s a whole new way of going about living our lives. For many, this signals changes in our health, socioeconomic status, and family dynamics. For others, it calls for major adjustment. We spend much of our lives at work and what was once routinized now needs to be remolded. As with all changes, good or bad, comes increased stress. If we are to enjoy retirement, we must learn to manage the change.

You now have time on your hands. Use this deck with friends and family to initiate conversations regarding the changes associated with retirement. Connect with other retirees and work together to apply the Skills & Attitudes of resilience to the challenges presented as well as your own. Use this deck in retirement seminars to prepare new retirees for the challenges ahead. Use it as a coaching tool ease the transition.

Red and white life buoy with round, black and white Bounceback logo in the center. This image is a link that leads to the Sales page.
Purchase BounceBack

Click on the above link on any of our pages and you will be taken to our sales page because…shopping should be easy. 

 

Southern Maine Resilience Task Force:

Meets 05/24/18 from 4-5:30 p.m. at Hope Gateway Church, 509 Forest Avenue, Portland ME 04101.

How do we Combat Loneliness?

Isolation of one individual.

I just finished an article entitled Loneliness Rivals Obesity, Smoking as Heath Risk by Nick Tate. A survey was conducted by Cigna and Tate reports that,

“Douglas Nemecek, MD, Cigna’s chief medical officer for behavioral health, said the findings of the study suggest that the problem has reached “epidemic” proportions, rivaling the risks posed by tobaccoand the nation’s ever-expanding waistline.

‘Loneliness has the same impact on mortality as smoking 15 cigarettes a day, making it even more dangerous than obesity,’ he said in releasing the report.”

Continue reading “How do we Combat Loneliness?”

Why Peer Coaching?

Open hands reaching skyward through bed of flowers.

“A man falls into a hole so deep he can’t get out. A doctor walks by, and the man calls for help. The doctor writes a prescription, tosses it into the hole, and walks on. A priest walks by, and the man tries again. The priest writes a prayer, tosses it into the hole, and walks on. Finally, a friend walks by, and again the man asks for help. To his surprise, the friend jumps in with him. “Why did you do that?” the man asks. “Now we’re both in the hole.” “Yes,” the friend responds. “But I’ve been in this hole before, and I know the way out.”

—Rebecca Clay, SAMHSA News 2004

Continue reading “Why Peer Coaching?”