Why BounceBack?

Today we celebrate the availability of BounceBack online. These are my thoughts.

A Path to Resilience

I worked in the human/social services field for forty-four years. I tried everything on the menu from non-profits to educational and medical institutions, self-employment, and government service. I was searching for the system that wasn’t flawed and/or broken. There was always something blocking the path to consistently effective service. Lack of funding, lack of staffing. Inadequate training or inconsistent support from co-workers, supervisors and/or the community. And then there are the unexpected (and sometimes tragic) changes that are implemented by unknowing bureaucrats in terms of how much and what type of services they determine necessary. Try as I may I never found the system that wasn’t flawed. Many were in fact broken. Continue reading “Why BounceBack?”

The Dropped Ball

Red and white life buoy with round, black and white Bounceback logo in the center. This image is a link that leads to the Sales page.

Have you ever ‘dropped the ball?’ I did yesterday. I was so focused on other issues that I did not post “Let’s Play BounceBack”.  For that, I wish to apologize. We’ll pick it back up tomorrow. Having said that, it leads me to some thoughts I’d like to share.

While it is not a good thing to drop the ball, it happens. The proverbial ball can be in serious play at the time of the drop or it can be the focus of recreational fun. The severity of the drop is usually determined by the setting in which it occurred. Recovering that ball may be a lifesaving measure or a matter of fun in the sun.

Challenges are part of life. As are our mistakes. It’s our responses to them that shapes our course in life. The above symbol reminds me that we can recover from the dropped ball. We need only reach for the tools we have to either save our lives or enjoy the fun.

You’ll see this symbol on our website and in our literature. When you see it, remember that you can build your resilience toolkit and we’re here to help.

Charlene Fernald Moynihan

Holidays

Portrait of Santa from 1881.

The Myriad Challenges of the Season.

Holidays are a time that should bring joy but often bring feelings of isolation and sadness. It should be a time when we count our blessings, but holidays often are a time when we count and remember the losses in our lives. This can be especially true for those who are living in a new country. These may be holidays they have never celebrated or understand. This is a time when the majority needs to understand the challenges that a minority of its citizens may be facing. Continue reading “Holidays”

Looking at Yourself: Part Two

How you and others see you.

Woman rests on mirrored surface gazing at her reflection.In the last blog, I asked you to evaluate yourself in five areas. The first area had to do with being able to communicate well with other people and being able to talk to other people. The second area had to do with being able to make and maintain friendships and relationships with others. The third had to do with being able to make changes in your life when you need to, e.g., being able to be flexible. The fourth area had to do with how you feel about yourself and your ability to feel positive about yourself and give yourself credit for the accomplishments in your life. The last area had to do with controlling your emotions, especially very strong ones, and emotions that other people might perceive as negative, e.g., anger.

Continue reading “Looking at Yourself: Part Two”

Common Ground: Bridging Police and Community Collaboration

Large group standing beneath the back of a billboard with fists raised in solidarity with the speaker.

Communities must work together to become resilient. Please enjoy this piece from our Guest Blogger: Richard C. Lumb, Ph. D.

As loud voices erupt to demand their particular agenda, the focus of disruption is often against police.  Remove the effectiveness of police and social chaos emerges.  Dampen the courage of leaders in support of order and chaos occurs.  Active or tacit refusal to demand social order for the substantial majority of citizens has the effect of emboldening the aberrant behaviors.  Peaceful protest, making a convincing argument and seeking collaborative change disappears to be replaced with chaos, and the effect on many is an unnecessary fear. Continue reading “Common Ground: Bridging Police and Community Collaboration”

How To Make Your Willpower Stronger And More Effective

How To Make Your Willpower Stronger And More Effective  by JOE ELLISON

“Ever wondered what life would be like if you had 50% more drive? Scrap that – how about 10%? With just a smidgen more purpose in your gut, you could be the go-getter you always wanted to be, finally mastering that guitar solo, winning that big promotion and getting that novel finished. It’s not out of reach. According to many experts, this drive to succeed is a finite source we create within ourselves, rather than a natural one: ‘Willpower isn’t something you’re born with,’ weighs in Dr Ron Breazeale, a US clinical psychologist specialising in resilience training, ‘It’s something you develop, create and move forward with.’ With the help of Breazeale, RISING reveals how to carpe the hell out of that diem.”

 

Radicalization

Isolation of one individual.

Most acts of terrorism in this country in the last ten years have been committed by persons radicalized in this country, not newly arriving immigrants or terrorists who have come across our borders.  These are people who have grown up in this country.  Some are first generation Americans, but many are fifth or tenth generation Americans.  But all have one thing in common.  They have not been integrated into our society.  They have not been integrated into our society not because they rejected us and our values, but unfortunately because in many ways we have rejected them. Continue reading “Radicalization”