Resilient Communities

Wheel with religious symbols.

At Building Resilience we have been discussing the difficulty some have with the application of resilience Skills & Attitudes and how they apply when it comes to building community resilience. Most of us can define resilience as the ability to “bounce back from hard times”. We have at least a basic understanding, through personal experience, of how the Skills & Attitudes can be used to deal with challenges on an individual level. But it is important to recognize the application to communities as well.

This morning I read an article online that appeared in The Press of Atlantic City titled Stockton conference highlights resilience in face of violence against religious people by COLT SHAW Staff Writer. In it he states, Continue reading “Resilient Communities”

Who am I and Why Resilience?

Boats docked on the South Portland side of Casco Bay Maine.

As Building Resilience embarks on our newest journey, I think about both where we are going and from whence we came. I see that my experiences with adversity and uncertainty have led me to where I am today. I learned the Skills & Attitudes of resilience by exposure to much adversity both personally and professionally. And though I have no regrets regarding my journey for it has made me who I am today…there are easier ways to learn.

Here is what I have learned from my journey. Continue reading “Who am I and Why Resilience?”

Is Resilience A “Mask”?

In an online article called Tackle reasons forcing nurses to be ‘resilient’, warn RCN members by  Junior Reporter and Online Assistant for Nursing Times, she writes, “Resilience is the “mask” that nurses are forced to wear because of workplace pressures and demands, members of the profession have warned during a discussion at the Royal College of Nursing congress this week.”

The attendees at the conference posed the question as to whether or not resilience is “a positive attribute and one to be aspired to in the modern healthcare workforce.” Continue reading “Is Resilience A “Mask”?”

Terrorism

The plight of the disenfranchised in our country.

Mass shootings and acts of violence are daily occurrences in our country. Most of these are committed by individuals who have lived in this country for many years and are often third and fourth generation Americans. Very few of these acts of violence have been committed by immigrants or foreign saboteurs. They are domestic terrorists. Unfortunately, we don’t seem to want to talk about or deal with these folks, and the present Administration would rather focus on building walls and expelling foreigners from this country. That, unfortunately, will not keep us safe.

There are many young people in America, some of them new arrivals, but many are third and fourth generation Americans who feel disenfranchised by this country, who do not feel a part of their communities. They indeed share many similarities with adolescents who have recently moved to a new community or school either from another part of this country or from another part of the world. Unfortunately, many of them lack the skills and attitudes necessary to become integrated into their communities.

One of the programs that we’ve been working on at Building Resilience would teach the skills and the attitudes of resilience that are necessary for their integration into our society. This program would focus on the empowerment of educators and students who would be actively involved in the creation of the program. Through increasing proficiency in these skills, such as connecting with others, communicating effectively, being flexible, being able to problem solve, manage strong feelings, and developed a sense of purpose, we would seek to increase self-esteem and integration. And most importantly, we would seek to decrease the likelihood of these young people becoming more disenchanted, isolated, dysfunctional, and radicalized. We do not need any more Sandy Hooks or Columbine shootings, or Boston Marathon bombings.

Better regulation of gun sales is important. And certainly, there is a need for better services for persons with a mental disorder. But more mental health services will not solve this problem. Research indicates that most of these individuals do not fit neatly into a diagnostic category of being mentally ill. What is clear is that most, whether they are from here or from another country, do not feel they have a viable role or place in our society. They are isolated and are easy targets for radicalization. We need to look at what we are doing to radicalize these young people and what we can do to make them a part of our society.

Dr. Ron Breazeale

Ron Breazeale, Ph.D.

 

 

 

 

 

Questions for our Followers

Four human silhouettes jumping against multi-colored backgrounds.

We would like your feedback. So much of what went into creating and updating BounceBack has been based on direct input/feedback from those of you who have shown interest in and/or purchased our tool.

In order to gather more valuable information, we have created two short surveys. One addresses marketing issues and the second communications. We posted the first to our webpage and social media sites last week. The second is now ready for completion.

We know that your time is valuable. May we ask that you take a few minutes to tell us what you think?

Please follow this link to our Marketing Survey

and

Please follow this link to our Communications Survey

Thank you for your support.