Chronic Pain

Staying home is not the best option.

Silhouette of a seated person inside a bubble.

As we said in the last blog a positive attitude and self-management skills can make it much easier to live with chronic pain. And as we said in the last blog, beliefs, circumstances, your mood, and the attention paid to the pain symptoms will determine in good part how difficult it is to manage.

Here is the situation people often face when dealing with chronic pain. The pain causes you to stay home alone, a lot. Your friends say, “Get out. Do something. Stop thinking about your pain all of the time.” They just don’t get it. If you hear it just one more time the outcome won’t be pretty. It’s easier to stay away from people than to risk arguing with them about the way you’re managing the pain or not managing it. Continue reading “Chronic Pain”

Chronic Pain

How the skills and attitudes of resilience can help manage chronic pain.

Blue-eyed man looks at his reflection in a broken mirror.

 

Attitude alone cannot cure chronic illness or chronic pain. Positive attitude and certain self-management skills can make it much easier to live with. In previous blogs, we have discussed chronic pain and its relationship to the opioid epidemic. In the next couple of blog posts, we are going to be discussing situations that people find themselves frequently when they experience chronic pain. And we will discuss the ways in which the skills and attitudes of resilience can help you manage the pain.

There is a great deal of research that shows that the experience of pain can be modified by circumstances, beliefs, mood, and the attention we pay to the pain symptoms. For example with arthritis of the knee, how depressed the person is better predicts how disabled, limited and uncomfortable they will be. What goes on in a person’s mind is often more important than what is going on in their body.

Continue reading “Chronic Pain”